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Education

Choosing the Right School for Your Child Part 3: Qualitative vs. Qualitative Data

Education and access to knowledge hold a sacred place for Black Americans. From the time when it was inaccessible to us, the risks that we took to acquire it, and the opportunities that have arisen for us from its acquisition, we have always valued learning and education.

Our demographic – the Black members of generations X and Y – have become the caretakers of that tradition. Now in our prime parenting years, we are faced with difficult choices as we consider the scholastic portion of our children’s education.

This series of articles chronicles five aspects to consider as you choose the right school for your child. There is no one strategy that will help you to find that “best fit”, but these basic guidelines will be beneficial to you on your search.

3. The qualitative data is infinitely more important than the quantitative data.

With the passage of the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB), schools have understandably begun to present their standardized test scores as proof of their ability to educate children (see my rant about NCLB here). In independent schools, they may present College Board scores in lieu of state-mandated ones. In either case, remember the phrase “quality of education”: it is your reminder that how well a school educates its students is a qualitative matter, and not solely a quantitative one.

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Education

Choosing the Right School for Your Child Part 2: Diversity and Overall School Health

Education and access to knowledge hold a sacred place for Black Americans. From the time when it was inaccessible to us, the risks that we took to acquire it, and the opportunities that have arisen for us from its acquisition, we have always valued learning and education.

Our demographic – the Black members of generations X and Y – have become the caretakers of that tradition. Now in our prime parenting years, we are faced with difficult choices as we consider the scholastic portion of our children’s education.

This series of articles chronicles five aspects to consider as you choose the right school for your child. There is no one strategy that will help you to find that “best fit”, but these basic guidelines will be beneficial to you on your search.

2. The overall health of a school can be measured by its commitment to diversity.

The National Association of Independent Schools (NAIS) considers “diversity” to consist of eight cultural identifiers: ability (mental and physical), age, ethnicity (includes country of origin and ancestry), gender, race, religion, sexuality, and socioeconomic status. Where a child falls within each of these eight categories – each one a continuum in itself – goes a long way toward determining who he or she is. The ideal school then, considers every student a “special case”, because the specific set of cultural identifiers they possess makes each child very unique.

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Education

Choosing the Right School for Your Child Part 1: Matchmaking vs. Prize-winning

Education and access to knowledge hold a sacred place for Black Americans. From the time when it was inaccessible to us, the risks that we took to acquire it, and the opportunities that have arisen for us from its acquisition, we have always valued learning and education.

Our demographic – the Black members of generations X and Y – have become the caretakers of that tradition. Now in our prime parenting years, we are faced with difficult choices as we consider the scholastic portion of our children’s education.

This series of articles chronicles five aspects to consider as you choose the right school for your child. There is no one strategy that will help you to find that “best fit”, but these basic guidelines will be beneficial to you on your search.

1.Choosing the right school is a match to be made, not a prize to be won.

The above quote was a mantra repeated by the Director of College Counseling for a school in Minneapolis at which I taught, but it applies to any school choice.   There are so many different types of schools: public, independent (private), parochial, Montessori, exceptional student education (a general term which includes gifted & talented as well as learning-disabled students), arts-based, sports academies… the list can daunting.

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Education

The Your Child Left Behind Act

left behindThe No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 is an educational reform package. It is open to some interpretation by each state, but the basics are: 1) every American student becomes proficient in math and writing by 2014, and 2) to eliminate and “achievement gap” that exists between children.

The premise of 100% proficiency is absurd. Not only is it unattainable, it undermines much needed science and social studies programs because those aren’t being tested.

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Blogs

Your Responses: Is The Big Check Really Worth It??

[Spotted on Roundup Russy’s Blog]

So I posted this question earlier today and you weighed in on the topic..”Is The Big Check Really Worth It?? For those who did not comment on the post on RoundupRussy.com.. here is what you all had to say:

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Blogs

Father-figure battles to keep kids in school

father-figure

Willie Thornton is on a rescue mission. One morning in March he set out to save Desmond Dunklin, a 19-year-old who should have graduated last year from Greenville High School in Greenville, Alabama.

Thornton, 48, the school’s dropout prevention coordinator, and Lt. Malcolm Owens, the school’s police officer, drive the five minutes to Dunklin’s house.

“I need for you to show up,” Thornton tells a sleepy Dunklin, who clearly has just been awakened by the men’s repeated knocking on his door.

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Blogs

Harlem Children’s Zone: A Unique Approach to Inner-City Poverty


Courtesy of The www.hcz.org

It has been called “one of the most ambitious social-service experiments of our time,” by The New York Times, the Harlem Children’s Zone® Project is a unique, holistic approach to rebuilding a community so that its children can stay on track through college and go on to the job market.